January 21, 2022

Lego Sets Could Be a Better Investment than Stocks, Bonds or Gold, New Study Says

A collection of Legos

Photo by Xavi Cabrera on Unsplash

If you’re a Lego collector and have ever been told you were wasting you money, there’s evidence to prove the contrary.

In 2020, Lego saw sales spoke more than 20% compared to 2019, and the company’s yearly revenue rose to around $6.99 billion.

In fact, a new Moscow study states that discontinued Lego sets can have more value than gold, stocks, bonds and other traditional investments.

In the study, published in the Research in International Business and Finance journal, researchers looked at the prices of more than 2,300 Lego sets from 1987 to 2015. It reports that they appreciated in value by around 11% each year, which is more than many traditional investments and certainly more than you would get in a savings account.

Researches discovered that logo kits that are small or very large grow faster in price than their medium-sized counterparts. The study also discovered that Lego kits crafted for specific movies, famous buildings or holidays get the most appreciation. Limited edition sets also do well.

“Investors in LEGO generate high returns from reselling unpacked sets, particularly rare ones, which were produced in limited editions or a long time ago. Sets produced 20-30 years ago make LEGO fans nostalgic, and prices for them go through the roof. But despite the high profitability of LEGO sets on the secondary market in general, not all sets are equally successful, and one must be a real LEGO fan to sort out the market nuances and see the investment potential in a particular set,” one of the researchers in the study, Victoria Dobrynskaya, said.

So, what are the most expensive sets? According to the study, the Star Wars series – including the Millennium Falcon, Death Star II and Imperial Star Destroyer – have gone up in value the most. Another valuable one is the Cafe Corner, which enjoyed a return of 2,230% from its release date in 2007 to 2015.